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Land Registry fees and Conveyancing

An additional cost when you move houses or change anything in the ownership are the Land Registry fees. What are these fees and why do you have to pay them? The Land Registry is a governmental agency responsible for every change you make in a title to the property and for all the details regarding a house owner. Any alteration must get through the Land Registry, so you are protected against squatters or tenants and to actually be the legal owner of your house.

Starting with 2014, the Land Registry system changed, and you are able to send any modifications and the necessary paperwork online, which saves you time and also considerably reduced the costs of the Land Registry fees. The difference between posting the alterations by post and by email can sometimes mean hundreds of pounds still in your pocket. You can check if your property is eligible for the electronic platform on the government website. The cost is significantly reduced for bigger properties, where the fee is lower even with £500.

What do you pay Land Registry Fees for? Anything from adding/removing a person from the property title, boundaries amendments, change of name, cancellation of the lease or equity sharing lease constitutes an adjustment to the property title, and there are different fees to be paid.

How can you pay the Land Registry fees?

  • By cheque or postal order
  • Credit/debit card/cash at one of the Land Registry agency, by appointment
  • Variable direct debit, through a Business e-services account

If you plan on buying a new residential property, we recommend a Land Registry search before the transaction. The search will reveal if the seller is the legal owner and if he has the right to sell. Also, there is information about the owners' equity (if the house is under Shared Ownership), any mortgages or leases and details about title registers, any plans or alterations brought to the property in the past and specifics about prior and current owners.

The related costs depend on the value of the property, application type and ownership transfer – in the case of a shared ownership and you only buy an equity (part), or you are the only owner (whole). To this, we add the difference between applying by post or on the digital platform.

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